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Mad Lib Fun For Kids

Feel free to print this mad lib or paste it into a word processor so you can fill in the blanks. I’ve also got a pdf version you can download. Mad libs for kids are a great way to teach them about story creation, parts of speech, all while playing and having a great time.

>#390: Unfortunately – Fortunately

>The game Unfortunately-Fortunately is a pile of fun and will get you thinking. Take turns with a friend or bunch of friends and switch between ‘unfortunately’ and ‘fortunately’. Start with unfortunately.For example:First person: “Unfortunately our essay that was due next week is really due tomorrow morning.”Next person: “Fortunately, I have mine done.”Next person: “Unfortunately the

>#363: Categories

>Categories can be a tricky game. If players are to keep the rhythm, this is a game best suited for ages 9 and up. If players don’t need to keep the rhythm, this game can be for younger players–ages 6 and up. Everyone sits in a circle and claps or slaps their legs to a

>#361: Telephone

>Telephone is a game that is best when you have 5 players or more players. How to play the telephone game: Have everyone sit in a circle. One player makes up a sentence—silly sentences are good—like, “On Sundays giraffes walk sideways in peanut butter.” They whisper their sentence in the ear of the next player.

>#340: Question – Question

>To play Question-Question, two people have a conversation with each other. Sound easy? Here’s the catch: both players can ONLY ask questions. If playing with more than two players, switch players out as they mess up (they don’t ask a question). Here is an example:Person one: How are you?Person two: What do you mean?Person one:

>#278: Add a Line Poems

>Someone starts a poem by writing down a line. The next person adds a line, and the poem goes from person to person until you have a whole poem. Variations: Cover all the lines except the last written line. This way the players can only see the last line and not the whole poem. Hint:

>#107: Swtich a Line

>Read a sentence from one story and then have a friend read a sentence from a different story. Take turns. Sometimes it gets pretty silly! Make it a family activity: Each member reads from their favourite book or magazine. This activity promotes literacy, listening skills as well as reading and listening comprehension skills.